VUMERITY
effectiveness

Understanding the potential benefits of VUMERITY

In clinical trials, a medication called dimethyl fumarate was tested in people with relapsing-remitting MS. Once it’s processed in the body, VUMERITY® (diroximel fumarate) takes the same active form as dimethyl fumarate. The information from the clinical trials is dimethyl fumarate data.

Two
separate studies

Each study
lasted two years

Over 1,500
people

STUDY 1
VUMERITY pill

410 people
took 240 mg of dimethyl fumarate twice a day

Placebo pill

408 people
took a placebo

STUDY 2
VUMERITY pill

359 people
took 240 mg of dimethyl fumarate twice a day

Placebo pill

363 people
took a placebo

VUMERITY is a pill that helps in three ways

Cuts relapses

Relapses (also called flare-ups or exacerbations) can be disruptive. Reducing the risk of relapses should be one of the goals of treatment.

Although no relapsing MS medication completely gets rid of relapses, dimethyl fumarate has been shown to reduce relapses compared with placebo.

Dimethyl fumarate cut the risk of relapses

27% of people taking dimethyl fumarate had a relapse, compared with 46% taking placebo.

Dimethyl fumarate cut the number of relapses

Dimethyl fumarate cut the number of relapses by 53% compared with placebo (dimethyl fumarate 0.172, placebo 0.364).

Dimethyl fumarate cut the risk of relapses

29% of people taking dimethyl fumarate had a relapse, compared with 41% taking placebo.

Dimethyl fumarate cut the number of relapses

Dimethyl fumarate cut the number of relapses by 44% compared with placebo (dimethyl fumarate 0.224, placebo 0.401).

May delay
disability progression

When you have relapsing MS, you know how important it is to stay as active and mobile as you possibly can.

Dimethyl fumarate was shown to delay the progression of disability, which is an important goal of treatment.

Disability progression was less likely

38% less likely

16% of people taking dimethyl fumarate experienced disability progression, compared with 27% taking placebo.

21% less likely

13% of people taking dimethyl fumarate experienced disability progression, compared with 17% taking placebo.

There was no statistically significant effect on disability progression in Study 2.

Slows the development of
brain lesions

The link between brain lesions and the progression of relapsing MS has not been confirmed. However, lesions can happen without you feeling them, which may be a sign that the disease is active. Brain lesions revealed on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan may help your healthcare provider determine how well your treatment is working. Talking to your healthcare provider about the results of your MRI could help with the management of your relapsing MS.

How dimethyl fumarate may help

To understand the impact of dimethyl fumarate on brain lesions, researchers looked at lesions using three different MRI techniques to determine the age and stage of the lesions. Based on all three measures, people taking dimethyl fumarate had fewer lesions compared with those taking placebo.

ACTIVE INFLAMMATION

(Average number of Gd+ lesions at 2 years)

1.8 PLACEBO

0.1 DIMETHYL FUMARATE

fewer Gd+ lesions for dimethyl fumarate

LONG-TERM IMPACT OF INFLAMMATION

(Average number of new or newly enlarging T2 lesions over 2 years)

17.0 PLACEBO

2.6 DIMETHYL FUMARATE

fewer T2 lesions for dimethyl fumarate

POSSIBLE PERMANENT DAMAGE

(Average number of new T1 lesions over 2 years)

5.6 PLACEBO

1.5 DIMETHYL FUMARATE

fewer T1 lesions for dimethyl fumarate

ACTIVE INFLAMMATION

(Average number of Gd+ lesions at 2 years)

2.0 PLACEBO

0.5 DIMETHYL FUMARATE

fewer Gd+ lesions for dimethyl fumarate

LONG-TERM IMPACT OF INFLAMMATION

(Average number of new or newly enlarging T2 lesions over 2 years)

17.4 PLACEBO

5.1 DIMETHYL FUMARATE

fewer T2 lesions for dimethyl fumarate

POSSIBLE PERMANENT DAMAGE

(Average number of new T1 lesions over 2 years)

7.0 PLACEBO

3.0 DIMETHYL FUMARATE

fewer T1 lesions for dimethyl fumarate